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The Kinship of Secrets

The riveting story of two sisters, one raised in the United States, the other in South Korea, and the family that bound them together even as the Korean War kept them apart.

Learn more

The Kinship of Secrets

The riveting story of two sisters, one raised in the United States, the other in South Korea, and the family that bound them together even as the Korean War kept them apart.

Learn more

Eugenia Kim

An MFA graduate of Bennington College, Eugenia has published short stories and essays in journals and anthologies, including Asia Literary Review and Raven Chronicles. She teaches at Fairfield University’s low-residency MFA Creative Writing Program.

Spanning Asia to America

Eugenia is the daughter of Korean immigrant parents who came to America shortly after the Pacific War.  “My parents’ stories seemed to carry an urgency meant to instill a Korean identity that was seeping from us with each new American word learned, each Korean word lost.”

eugenia kim author
Eugenia Kim

An MFA graduate of Bennington College, Eugenia has published short stories and essays in journals and anthologies, including Asia Literary Review and Raven Chronicles. She teaches at Fairfield University’s low-residency MFA Creative Writing Program.

Spanning Asia to America

Eugenia is the  daughter of Korean immigrant parents who came to America shortly after the Pacific War.  “My parents’ stories seemed to carry an urgency meant to instill a Korean identity that was seeping from us with each new American word learned, each Korean word lost.”

eugenia kim author

Eugenia Kim is the author of two novels: The Calligrapher’s Daughter and The Kinship of Secrets. She has published short stories and essays in journals and anthologies, including Asia Literary Review and Raven Chronicles. An MFA graduate of Bennington College, she teaches at Fairfield University’s low-residency MFA Creative Writing Program.

Eugenia is the daughter of Korean immigrant parents who came to America shortly after the Pacific War.  “My parents’ stories seemed to carry an urgency meant to instill a Korean identity that was seeping from us with each new American word learned, each Korean word lost.”

Books by Eugenia Kim

The Kinship of Secrets

From the author of The Calligrapher’s Daughter comes the riveting story of two sisters, one raised in the United States, the other in South Korea, and the family that bound them together even as the Korean War kept them apart. 

Learn more

The Calligrapher's Daughter

A sweeping novel, inspired by the life of the author’s mother, about a young woman named Najin Han who is the privileged daughter of a calligrapher. In the shadow of the dying monarchy, Najin longs to choose her own destiny and dares to fight for a brighter future in occupied Korea. 

Learn more

Books by Eugenia Kim

The Kinship of Secrets

From the author of The Calligrapher’s Daughter comes the riveting story of two sisters, one raised in the United States, the other in South Korea, and the family that bound them together even as the Korean War kept them apart. 

Learn more
The Calligrapher's Daughter

A sweeping novel, inspired by the life of the author’s mother, about a young woman named Najin Han who is the privileged daughter of a calligrapher. In the shadow of the dying monarchy, Najin longs to choose her own destiny and dares to fight for a brighter future in occupied Korea. 

Learn more

“We cannot escape our origins, however hard we try, those origins — which contain the key, could we but find it — to all that we later become.”

– James Baldwin, “Nobody Knows My Name”

“We cannot escape our origins, however hard we try, those origins — which contain the key, could we but find it — to all that we later become.”

– James Baldwin

“We cannot escape our origins, however hard we try, those origins — which contain the key, could we but find it — to all that we later become.”

– James Baldwin

From my journal ...

Wizard of Oz book - photo by Suzanne Harrison

Orange Peels and Oz

I was the youngest of six kids in a Korean immigrant family. There were eight of us in a two-bedroom house in Takoma Park, just no…
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